Eli Roth Takes Keanu Reeves to Hell and Back in ‘Knock Knock’

When Eli Roth directs a picture, there’s a specific anticipation from the film. Gore, disturbing imagery and absolute horror are related to the director of Hostel and Cabin Fever. Roth knows that as well as anyone. With his latest picture Knock Knock, he uses those expectations to his edge to toy with all the crowd. The film builds, but scenarios don’t get violent. What exactly is the point here? That may be frustrating in the control of another filmmaker, but not from Roth. For almost half of Knock Knock, the film presents new, difficult and exceedingly uncomfortable situations for the characters. And because you've no notion what’s going to happen, that’s thrilling and terrifying in its own exceptional way.Knock Knock, which stars Keanu Reeves as a joyful husband randomly thrust into an uncomfortable position with two young girls, premiered this weekend at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. Continue reading our Knock Knock review.Evan (Reeves) appears like the best man. He’s an architect, lives in a delightful California residence, has a wonderful gifted wife along with two kids. One day, the wife and kids visit the beach but Evan has to stay home and work. Two lovely young girls, played by Ana De Armas and Lorenza Izzo, are standing in the cold. They ’ re drenched, disoriented and only want to come in to dry off and use the telephone.Images trailers, interviews and more are sure to provide you with a better idea of what happens next but it’ s probably best if you don’t understand.Reeves doesn’t feel quite appropriate in this function as Knock Knock begins. We aren’ it feels off and t used to seeing him as a father. But when the family leaves and he’s on his own? That’s a part he’s perfect for and when Knock Knock really gets cooking. Then you add Izzo and De Armas, two celebrities with an amazing chemistry and energy. In a single shot, they are able to steer from innocent to scary, alluring and goofy. They’re an exceptional, frightening, horror duet that is modern. You can’t take your eyes off them, yet seeing them never quite feels good.The movie does falter a bit as strategies and the motivations are shown. The whole film is structured to keep you on your toes, but the storyline itself never lives up to expectations set by the tension.Nevertheless, Knock Knock is another powerful example of Eli Roth making the audience uncomfortable: Building tension, asking questions, and doing what he does best. A few lumps aside, Knock Knock is an enjoyable, first ride.

When Eli Roth directs a picture, there’s a specific anticipation from the film. Gore, disturbing imagery and absolute horror are related to the director of Hostel and Cabin Fever. Roth knows that as well as anyone. With his latest picture Knock Knock, he uses those expectations to his edge to toy with all the crowd. The film builds, but scenarios don’t get violent. What exactly is the point here? That may be frustrating in the control of another filmmaker, but not from Roth. For almost half of Knock Knock, the film presents new, difficult and exceedingly uncomfortable situations for the characters. And because you’ve no notion what’s going to happen, that’s thrilling and terrifying in its own exceptional way.

Knock Knock, which stars Keanu Reeves as a joyful husband randomly thrust into an uncomfortable position with two young girls, premiered this weekend at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. Continue reading our Knock Knock review.

Evan (Reeves) appears like the best man. He’s an architect, lives in a delightful California residence, has a wonderful gifted wife along with two kids. One day, the wife and kids visit the beach but Evan has to stay home and work. Two lovely young girls, played by Ana De Armas and Lorenza Izzo, are standing in the cold. They ’ re drenched, disoriented and only want to come in to dry off and use the telephone.

Images trailers, interviews and more are sure to provide you with a better idea of what happens next but it’ s probably best if you don’t understand.

Reeves doesn’t feel quite appropriate in this function as Knock Knock begins. We aren’ it feels off and t used to seeing him as a father. But when the family leaves and he’s on his own? That’s a part he’s perfect for and when Knock Knock really gets cooking. Then you add Izzo and De Armas, two celebrities with an amazing chemistry and energy. In a single shot, they are able to steer from innocent to scary, alluring and goofy. They’re an exceptional, frightening, horror duet that is modern. You can’t take your eyes off them, yet seeing them never quite feels good.

The movie does falter a bit as strategies and the motivations are shown. The whole film is structured to keep you on your toes, but the storyline itself never lives up to expectations set by the tension.

Nevertheless, Knock Knock is another powerful example of Eli Roth making the audience uncomfortable: Building tension, asking questions, and doing what he does best. A few lumps aside, Knock Knock is an enjoyable, first ride.



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